First Prakash of the Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji – 1 September 1604

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First Prakash of the Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji at Harmandir Sahib.
First Prakash of the Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji at Harmandir Sahib.

First Prakash of the Sri Guru Granth Sahib ji at Harmandir Sahib.

 
Important Milestones
• 30 August 1604: Completion of Adi Granth
• 1 September 1604: Adi Granth installed for the first time at Harimander Sahib by Guru Arjan Dev ji
• 1705: The Damdama Sahib Bir was completed by Guru Gobind Singh Ji from memory.
• 20 October 1708: Installation of the Guru Granth Sahib Ji as eternal Guru
 
Sri Guru Granth Sahib ( ਸ਼੍ਰੀ ਗੁਰੂ ਗ੍ਰੰਥ ਸਾਹਿਬ ਜੀ , srī gurū granth sāhib jī ) is the religious Scripture of Sikhism. It is the final and eternal guru of the Sikhs It is a voluminous text of 1430 angs, compiled and composed during the period of Sikh gurus, from 1469 to 1708.
It is a collection of hymns (shabda) or baani describing the qualities of God and why one should meditate on God’s name. Guru Gobind Singh (1666–1708), the tenth guru, affirmed the sacred text Adi Granth as his successor, elevating it to Guru Granth Sahib.
The text remains the holy scripture of the Sikhs, regarded as the teachings of the Ten Gurus. The role of Adi Granth, as a source or guide of prayer, is pivotal in worship in Sikhism.
The Adi Granth was first compiled by the fifth Sikh guru, Guru Arjan Dev ji (1563–1606), from hymns of the first five Sikh gurus and other great saints, or bhagats, including those of the Hindu and Muslim faiths.
It is written in the Gurmukhī script, predominantly in archaic Punjabi, with occasional use of other languages including Braj Bhasha, Khariboli, Sanskrit, and Persian, often coalesced under the generic title of Sant Bhasha.
 
Composition Main article: Gurmukhī

Main article: Ragas in the Guru Granth Sahib ji

The Sikh Gurus developed a new writing system, Gurmukhī, for writing their sacred literature. Although the exact origins of the script are unknown, it is believed to have existed in an elementary form during the time of Guru Nanak Dev Ji.
According to Sikh tradition, Guru Angad Ji is said to have invented the script and popularised its use among the Sikhs. It is stated in Mahman Prakash, an early Sikh manuscript, that the script was invented by Guru Angad Dev Ji at the suggestion of Guru Nanak Dev Ji during the lifetime of the founder. The word Gurmukhī translates as “from the mouth of the Guru”.
The script was used, from the outset, for compiling Sikh scriptures. The Sikhs assign a high degree of sanctity to the Gurmukhī language script; it is also the official script for the Indian State of Punjab.
 
The end part of the handwritten Adi Granth, by Pratap Singh Giani, located on the first floor of Harmandir Sahib. 
The Guru Granth Sahib is divided into fourteen hundred and thirty pages known as Angs (limbs) in Sikh tradition. It can be divided into three different sections:
1. Introductory section consisting of the Mul Mantra, Japji and Sohila composed by Guru Nanak
2. Compositions of Sikh Gurus followed by those of Different Bhagats who just know Only the God, collected according to the chronology of Ragas or musical notes.
3. Compositions of Guru Tegh Bahadur.
The poems are divided based on their musical setting in different ragas. A raga is a series of melodic motifs, based upon a definite scale or mode, that provides a basic structure around which the musician performs.
The ragas are associated with different moods and times of the day and year. The total number of ragas in the Sikh system is thirty-one, divided into fourteen ragas and seventeen raginis (less important or less definite ragas). Within the raga division, the songs are arranged in order of the Sikh gurus and Sikh bhagats with whom they are associated.

Although there are 31 main Ragas in the Guru Granth Sahib with a total of 60 that include sub-raags. A raga is a complex structure of musical melody used in the Indian classical music. It is a set of rules of how to build a melody that can ignite a certain mood in the reciter and listeners.

Each raga is a chapter or section in the Guru Granth Sahib starting with Asaa Raag, and all the hymns produced in Asaa Raag are found in this section ordered chronologically by the Guru or other Bhagat that have written hymns in that raga.

Following is the list of all sixty Raags under which Gurbani is written, in order of appearance. 1. Asa 2. Gujari 3. Gauri Deepaki 4. Dhanasri 5. Gauri Poorabi 6. Siri 7. Majh 8. Gauri Guarairee 9. Gauri 10. Gauri Dakhani 11. Gauri Chaitee 12. Gauri Bairagan 13. Gauri Poorabi Deepaki 14. Gauri Malva

15. Gauri Mala 16. Gauri Majh 17. Gauri Sorath 18. Asa Kafi 19. Asavari 20. Asa Asavari 21. Devgandhari 22. Bihagra 23. Vadhans 24. Vadhans Dakhani 25. Sorath 26. Jaitsri 27. Todi 28. Bairarri 29. Tilang 30. Tilang Kafi 31. Suhee 32. Suhee Kafi 33. Suhee Lalit 34. Bilaval 35. Bilaval Dakhani 36. Gound 37. Bilaval Gound 38. Ramkali 39. Ramkali Dakhani 40. Nut Narayan 41. Nut 42. Mali Gaura 43. Maru

44. Maru Kafi 45. Maru Dakhani 46. Tukhari 47. Kedara 48. Bhairo 49. Basant 50. Basant Hindol 51. Sarang 52. Malhar 53. Kanra 54. Kaliyan 55. Kaliyan Bhopali 56. Parbhati 57. Parbhati Bibhas 58. Bibhas Parbhati 59. Parbhati Dakhani 60. Jaijavanti

Raags are used in Sikh music simply to create a mood and are not restricted to particular times. A mood can be created by the music of the raag regardless of the time of day. There are a total of 60 ragas or melodies within the Guru Granth Sahib.

 Bhul chuk maaf
 

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4 COMMENTS

    • Your comment is awaiting moderation
      The whole baani of Guru Granth Sahib ji is written under sixty raags of equal and independent status.

      Each raag sets a particular mood for the hymn, adding a deeper dimension to it.

      The Guru Granth Sahib is incorrectly thought by many to have just 31 raags or melodies.

      Out of the 60 raags, 39 are single raags 21 are mishrat raags which are mixed melodies created by blending together two raags or melodies to create an entirely new and independent raag or melody. The primary raag or melody contains the main foundation, identity and characteristic which is then influenced by the secondary raag or melody.

      • Pyare Rajinder Singh Ji,
        Waheguru Ji Ka khalsa waheguru ji ki fateh,
        Thank you for making us aware of the mistake in the article. If we look at it superficially, usually information is given only about 31 ragas, which are the main ragas of Guru Granth Sahib Ji. As per your request, the mixed ragas have also been updated. We hope that you will keep us informed about such mistakes and improvements in future also. Thank you once again for giving your valuable time to Dhansikhi.

  1. The whole baani of Guru Granth Sahib ji is written under sixty raags of equal and independent status.

    Each raag sets a particular mood for the hymn, adding a deeper dimension to it.

    The Guru Granth Sahib is incorrectly thought by many to have just 31 raags or melodies.

    Out of the 60 raags, 39 are single raags 21 are mishrat raags which are mixed melodies created by blending together two raags or melodies to create an entirely new and independent raag or melody. The primary raag or melody contains the main foundation, identity and characteristic which is then influenced by the secondary raag or melody.

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